'no reply' | 

Dublin man charged with possessing €270k in crime proceeds and using Signal app to launder money

Patrick O’Reilly (35) of Newcastle, Co Dublin, ‘made no reply’ to the charges

Mr O’Reilly is also accused of having a Samsung mobile phone with the Signal app for commission, preparation, facilitation or instigation of money laundering

Tom TuiteSunday World

A Dublin man has been charged with possessing almost €270,000 in crime proceeds and using the Signal messaging app to launder money.

Patrick O’Reilly, 35, Parsons Court, Newcastle, Co. Dublin, appeared before Judge David McHugh at Blanchardstown District Court on Thursday following an investigation by the Garda National Drugs & Organised Crime Bureau (GNDOCB).

He is accused of knowingly possessing €179,780, the proceeds of criminal conduct, at his home address on June 14.

He allegedly had a further €89,500 in crime proceeds in a motor vehicle at his address on the same date. Mr O’Reilly is also accused of having a Samsung mobile phone with the Signal app for commission, preparation, facilitation or instigation of money laundering.

The crime proceeds-related charges are under the Criminal Justice (Money Laundering & Terrorist Financing) Act 2010.

He also has a single Misuse of Drugs Act charge for unlawfully possessing cocaine on the same date in the vehicle, but the value was not stated during the hearing.

Detective Garda Liam Mangan said Mr O’Reilly “made no reply” to the charges. He added that the Director of Public Prosecutions has directed “trial on indictment on all matters”.

It means the case will be transferred to the Circuit Court, which has broader sentencing powers.

There was no objection to bail.

Judge McHugh ordered Mr O’Reilly, who has not yet indicated a plea, to appear again in January to be served with a book of evidence and returned for trial.

Defence solicitor Conor Ruane applied for legal aid; he said his client was employed but had completed a statement of his means, which was handed into court.

Judge McHugh noted the case would go forward to a higher court, and he acceded to the request.

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