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Ian Bailey reveals his 'profound shock' after partner Jules Thomas dumped him by letter

Writing in the Big Issue, the 64-year-old recalled how, after a lonely Christmas spent alone, 2021 turned out to be 'the most traumatic and testing period of my life'
Ian Bailey has always denied involvement in the 1996 murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier. Photo: Collins Courts

Ian Bailey has always denied involvement in the 1996 murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier. Photo: Collins Courts

Neil Fetherstonhaugh

Ian Bailey, the self-confessed prime suspect in the Sophie du Plantier murder, has described for the first time his “profound shock” after his long-time partner Jules Thomas dumped him by letter.

Writing in the Big Issue, the 64-year-old recalled how, after a lonely Christmas spent alone, 2021 turned out to be “the most traumatic and testing period of my life”.

He claimed that his painting partner outlined her feelings in a letter before leaving it on the kitchen table addressed to him in her West Cork home last March.

Bailey tells how he spent most of that Christmas on his own after “Jules went off to be with her family in Cork”.

However, he explains that “after 24 years of interference, abuse and false accusation”, 2021 was to become “the most traumatic and testing period of my life”.

He told how in March the letter arrived, hand addressed to him and he remembered Jules putting it down on the kitchen table.

“I did not recognise the writing and opened it wondering who it was from and what message it would contain,” he reveals.

He claims it “was written by a third party" informing him that Jules wanted him out of her life and out of the house.

“Our journey was at an end,” he adds. “The shock was profound.”

Bailey has consistently protested his innocence over the 1996 killing of French film executive, Ms Toscan du Plantier.

The body of the French mother-of-one was found on a laneway leading to her isolated holiday home at Toormore outside Schull in west Cork on December 23, 1996

She had been savagely beaten to death.

Mr Bailey was arrested by gardaí in both 1997 and 1998 but was released without charge on both occasions.

The DPP ruled in 2000/2001 that the Manchester-born freelance journalist and poet had no case to answer.

Bailey claims that sinister attempts were made to frame him for the crime.

He was convicted in absentia of the killing by a Paris court in May 2019 after a prosecution he dismissed as "a show trial" and "a mockery of justice."

Ian Bailey with his former partner Jules Thomas

Ian Bailey with his former partner Jules Thomas

Earlier this year Jules revealed Bailey physically abused her a number of times.

In an interview with Virgin Media, Bailey was asked about when he attacked his former partner on at least one occasion, leading her to be hospitalised.

When it was put to him by Colette Fitzpatrick that Jules once needed hospital treatment for an injured eye, which she nearly lost, he paused before replying: “Hmm, I know, it’s shameful.”

It was then pointed out that the eye was swollen ‘the size of a grapefruit’.

“I think that was grossed exaggeration, but I do accept…,” he remarked, before Colette stressed “hospital”.

“Yes, she was, “ confirmed Bailey.

When he was told that Jules also had to get eight stitches in a cut lip she got as a result of his violent attack, he sighed: “Hmm, I know, it’s shameful.”

In October, it was revealed how Bailey had secured temporary emergency accommodation and was living in a log cabin in the seaside village of Glengarriff in West Cork, following the breakdown of his 30-year relationship.

Mr Bailey was housed in a log cabin, designated by the council as emergency accommodation, and was said to be happy with his new lodgings.

Mr Bailey has been writing his own life story in a series of articles being published by The Big Issue magazine.

The series details his early life in Britain before he moved to Ireland and delves into his life since the unsolved 1996 murder.

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